Sharing the Cornerstones of homesteading and good farm living.

THIS PAGE IS STILL UNDER CONSTRUCTION BUT......

We are now up to QUEEN ANNE'S LACE (40 topics done, "only" 13 more to go).  I am still working on putting in links, full descriptions and more herbs on this page.  This is VERY time consuming and I am working on it in all my spare time.  Please be patient.  You will see some lines highlighted in green.....this is for my benefit to remind me which lines still need information on certain herbs I have already started. 

Last update:  12/20/14

A word about what I will cover here.....

***************DISCLAIMER*************** 

Please read our disclaimer before proceeding!

Herb INDEX

There are literally thousands of known medicinal herbs.  I only plan on covering a very small amount of those herbs.  All will be plants I have used or have gathered for possible future use.  Furthermore, those will be herbs I wildcraft, grow in my garden/yard or can purchase from my local health foods store.  Some I will add here that I have only been able to purchase on-line, in that case I will be sure to try and include a link to where I purchase. 

Plants are listed in alphabetical order by common name.  Below is a table of contents (by common name) which can bring you directly to that herb. You can use your browsers "find" function to better navigate the page. This should allow you to search by either common name, scientific name, vitamin, mineral, use and properties. 

I hope to cover the following for each plant that can be wildcrafted or grown in our area:

 

  • Plant properties (there is a Glossary at the bottom of this page)
  • Uses
  • Availability (whether wildcrafted, grown on site or purchased)
  • What part(s) of the plant to use
  • What part(s) of the plant to avoid
  • When to harvest (including time of year and age of plant)
  • How to preserve
  • How to propagate in your own garden
  • Precautions/side effects (including use during pregnancy)
  • Chemical constituents (I will only be highlighting the vitamins, minerals and other items I feel is relevant to their medicinal properties.)
  • A picture (for reference only; Not for use in identifying plants for personal use)

Added notes: 

If you find information you feel is faulty or erroneous in the following pages PLEASE contact us.

Remember that the better your soil is the better the plants grown in them will be.  This means healthy soil will produce plants that have more of the important nutrients and chemicals in them that make them useful as listed below.  It relates directly to the efficacy of the plant.  

Refrain from wildcrafting on the side of busy (or even semi busy roads) as these plants may carry dangerous build ups of exhaust emission toxins. Especially perennial rootstock.

Try to avoid harvesting from fields where chemicals have been used.

Harvest only from healthy looking plants, avoid rotting or otherwise "infected" looking plants.

Not all uses listed are PROVEN uses,.  Since we do use them for that reason or we have seen many references as it being used for that reason with no ill effects, we have decided to list those uses.  Also, not all uses are listed.  I have other areas (such as our "In the Barn" page) that will give specific recipes and uses.  This page is mainly to give you an idea of the herbs we have/use and allow you to cross reference their generic uses to perhaps help you make up your own formulas as needed.

I'm keeping it simple.  You won't find extremely in-depth information on these pages, but you will find a good compilation of understandable and usable information of the WHAT, the WHERE, the HOW and the WHY. 

I will not put much, if any, info regarding dosages here since dosages differ between species, weight, age and usage.  I will however in the recipe pages put what dosages we used when using mixtures. 

Remember, we are located in the Northern part of Michigan's lower peninsula.  So what we have available here may differ from what you have in your location. 

I will try and highlight any high content vitamins and/or minerals found in each herb.  For instance yellow dock root is a very high in iron and catnip is high in B-complex. 

In some cases I will add an "L" or "R" or "S" or "Fr" or "Fl"  after info listed below.  This will identify if the comment or info is specific to Leaf, Root, Seed, Fruit or Flower.

If you would like to find more information regarding a plant's use for a specific condition try searching something like "How to use Catnip for reducing fever" via the internet.  At this time on this page I am only hoping to familiarize people with what herbs are very easily available and what common uses they have.  There are so many well put together sites already in place out there with all the intricate "how to do its".  Maybe once we get the basics in and I have more time I will consider adding the "how" to the herbs on this page.

CAUTIONS:

While by no means the ONLY cautions to observe, here are a few to keep in mind and we will update it as we find more information.

Do NOT use internally during pregnancy:   Coltsfoot

Don NOT use at all during pregnancy:

Use with extreme caution during pregnancy:

Avoid use of during lactation(some may cause reduction in milk supply):

 

HERB INDEX

Informational section (please read before using this page)

Caution section This section sums up some of the pregnancy warnings and other such precautions to take with certain herbs.

Activated Charcoal

Alfalfa

Apple Cider Vinegar

Blackberry

Black Walnut

Brigham Tea

Burdock

Cascara Sagrada

Catnip

Cayenne

Chickweed

Chicory

Cinnamon

Clove

Comfrey

Dandelion

Echinacea

Eucalyptus

Fennel

Garlic

German Chamomile

Goldenseal

Honey

Hops

Juniper

Lavender

Lemon Balm

Lemongrass

Licorice

Lobelia

Male Fern

Mallow

Molasses

Mullein

Myrrh 

Olive Leaf

Pau D’arco

Peppermint

Plantain

Purslane

Queen Anne's Lace (Wild Carrot)

Red Clover

Red Raspberry

Shepherd's Purse

Slippery Elm

Spirulina

Stinging Nettle

St. John’s Wort

Tea Tree

Thyme

Wild Yam

Wormwood

Yarrow

Yellow Dock

 

Herbs yet to consider and research:

Don't panic or judge on some of the herbs/plants you will see listed below. Just consider this area a "scratch pad" .  It is a place for me to keep track of a few things I have heard about our seen on the web or in books that I feel needs further research on my end before actually considering anything for our medicine cabinet.  By research I mean looking for more information and scientific research if possible.....NOT willy nilly trying things on my animals or ourselves.  The notes also include the use(s) I have found mentioned.  

Basil

clove basil (Ocimum gratissimum Linn) - dewormer (H. Contortus)

Corriander (Coriandrum sativum Linn)-dewormer(H. Contortus)

Marijuana (Cannabis sativa) - dewormer (flukes)

Fennugreek

While not a specific "herb" I would like to add a small section specific to some of the Essential oils  we use often as well.

 

ACTIVATED CHARCOAL

PROPERTIES:  Due to it's porous nature (specially burned to create these extra pores) it works well to "trap" toxins and pass them through the system.

USES: Activated charcoal is used to treat poisonings, reduce flatulence, lower cholesterol levels, prevent hangover, and treat bile flow problems (cholestasis) during pregnancy.  We have used this after worming and found it works great for eliminating diarrhea, especially when feed related. 

AVAILABILITY:  Purchased from the local health food store.

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  Constipation is a possible side effect as well as black stools.  Because activated charcoal binds with many chemicals, it's use while taking certain oral medications should be monitored.

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS: Charcoal.....the key is the FORM of the charcoal, or the actually physical shape (extremely porous) that helps it perform its function!

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Alfalfa (Medicago sativa)

PROPERTIES: for use as a health supplement

USES: Arthriits, diabetes, appetite disorders

AVAILABILITY:  Easily available 

PARTS USED: aerial parts, seeds

PARTS TO AVOID:

WHEN TO HARVEST:

HOW TO PRESERVE: best fresh, but can be dried

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: fresh, commercial tablets, tinctures

HOW TO PROPAGATE: by seed

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  Allergic reactions have been known to occur

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS:  protein, sugars, chlorophyll, enzymes, plant estrogens, minerals: calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, silicon vitamins B, C, E and K,

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Apple Cider Vinegar

Check your labels....this should be REAL ACV (not "apple flavored").  It is best to be organic and it needs to include the "mother". 

PROPERTIES: Probiotic

USES: Probiotic, carrier liquid for drenches, 

RECIPE: We use in our goats (mainly the bucks) water to help with prevention of Urinary Calculi.  The dosage we use is 1/4C per 5 gallons. 

This makes a good "medium" to add to most drenches we use.

AVAILABILITY: I purchase this at my local chain grocery store.  Bragg's brand is by far the favored brand.  However, be aware that you CAN make your own ACV.  Check out some fermenting groups or search the web for more information and recipes. 

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Black Walnut (Juglans nigra)

PROPERTIES: Alterative; Anodyne; Anti-inflammatory; Astringent; Blood purifier; Blood  tonic; Detergent; Emetic; Laxative; Pectoral; Vermifuge.

USES: as a dye (Hair, fabric, yarn); dewormer; treating ringworm; skin issues; laxative; toothache; headache

AVAILABILITY:    Many neighborhoods (especially rural) have a black walnut tree or two.  Check with your neighbors....many would be happy to have those "awful" green balls picked up from their yards.  We purchase a capsule from our local healthfood store.

PARTS USED:  Leaves, nut, hull, bark

PARTS TO AVOID:

WHEN TO HARVEST:  Hulls are harvested when they drop, nuts can be dried.

HOW TO PRESERVE:  drying

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: tincturing is great and what we use most.  drying.

HOW TO PROPAGATE:  Walnut trees grow well in our area and trees can grow up to 20' tall in 10 years.  Plant whole nuts in the shell or transplant seedlings.  Just watch WHERE you plant it as the leaves/roots have chemical constituents that inhibit the growth of other vegetation around it.

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:   Not to be used on camelids or equines (including in the form of sawdust or bedding) as they tend to have sensitivities to the compound juglone in them.

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS: Vitamins:  B1, C,  Minerals: Cobalt, Iron, potassium selenium;  juglone, iodine, tannins;

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Blackberry (Rubus fructicosus among others)

NOTE: Not to be confused with the black raspberry. 

PROPERTIES:  Anti-diarrheal,

USES:  sore throats, diarrhea,

AVAILABILITY:  Easily found wild and can just as easily be grown in your own yard. 

PARTS USED: Leaves, fruit, root

PARTS TO AVOID: Watch the thorns on the canes!

WHEN TO HARVEST: Leaves : anytime but preferably before they begin to die off in the fall

fruit: when ripe (late summer/early fall)

HOW TO PRESERVE: Leaves: drying

METHODS OF USE/DOSING:  Decoction, gargle, fresh,

HOW TO PROPAGATE: plant root stock or increase berry patch size by layering canes

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  None known.

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS: tannins, flavonoids

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Brigham Tea (Ephedra nevadensis)

PROPERTIES: Diuretic, tonic, blood purifying, febrifuge

USES: asthma, hay fever, cold or flu, arthritis, coughs, fevers, headaches, rheumatism, acne, a digestive tonic, copper supplement (for our goats),

AVAILABILITY:  We order a powder on-line.

PARTS USED: twigs/stems

PARTS TO AVOID: NA

WHEN TO HARVEST: Anytime

HOW TO PRESERVE: drying

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: Infusions or tinctures (but infusions recommended)

HOW TO PROPAGATE:  Grows in southern parts of the US and into Mexico. Propagation by seeds  Need a male and female plant to get seeds.

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  advice says to avoid while pregnant or nursing; can cause digestive issues, liver issues and possible nose or throat cancers from drinking excessive amounts of tea

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS: minerals: Calcium, copper, protein; tannins, resin, volatile oil  

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Burdock (Arctium minus)

PROPERTIES: Alterative, Diuretic, Laxative, Tonic, Antibacterial, antiviral, fungicidal,

AVAILABILITY:  I grow this horrible  lovely herb right here on our property. 

USES: blood detoxifier, removal of kidney stones,

PARTS USED: Leaves, roots, fruits, seeds

PARTS TO AVOID: While the burrs are used medicinally, be careful while collecting.

WHEN TO HARVEST: Best to harvest in it's first year

Roots:  Late fall or early spring of its FIRST year (burdock is a biennial).

Leaves: anytime, but young leaves are best 

HOW TO PRESERVE:  Leaves: drying, tincture,

Roots:  Drying, tincture (preferred)

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: Root: tea, capsules, tinctures, poultices, salves

Leaves: tea, capsules, infused oils, fresh (culinary)

Seeds: decoction,

HOW TO PROPAGATE: Burdock is not difficult to grow, but hard to eradicate once established.  Pretty simple to grow, just plant a burr or two  where you would like to establish a patch.  I recommend setting many more than one or two though since you will be wanting to harvest roots. 

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  When deciding where (or if) to put Burdock in your own yard remember that the burrs can wreck havoc on pets and livestock.  Caution MUST be used during pregnancy....best to avoid in large quantities.  May interfere with blood sugar and medications to regulate blood sugar. 

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS:  vitamins A, B1(thiamine) B2(riboflavin), B3 (niacin), B5 and vitamin C;  minerals  calcium, iron, Manganese, phosphorus,  selenium and zinc;   fiber, flavonoids, tannins, essential oils, polyacetylene and phytosterols.

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Cascara Sagrada (Rhamnus purshiana)

PROPERTIES: Hepatic, Laxative

USES: constipation, often used in herbal wormers to help pass worm load die-offs,

AVAILABILITY:    I bought this in capsule form, but it is available in bulk as well through some reputable sources. 

METHODS OF USE/DOSING:  tinctures, powders, usually mixed within herbal recipes.

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  Not for use when pregnant or nursing.  Not for prolonged use.

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS:  Anthraquinones, tannins, volatile oils; minerals: Calcium

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Catnip  (Nepeta Cataria)

PROPERTIES: Emetic, antispasmodic, carminative, diaphoretic, emmenagogue, nervine, stomachic, stimulant, and mild sedative.

USES: Relaxation, colic, digestive issues, respiratory infections, relieving nausea, reducing fever, cold, flu, painful joints, hemorrhoids , insomnia

AVAILABILITY:  Easily cultivated by cuttings or seed.

PARTS USED: leaves, stems, flowers (all aerial parts)

PARTS TO AVOID: No known "dangerous" parts of this plant, but the root is generally not used.

WHEN TO HARVEST: Any time after morning dew is dried off.

HOW TO PRESERVE: drying

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: Salves, teas, tinctures, enema, fresh leaves (culinary)

HOW TO PROPAGATE: You can easily start catnip by seed.  It is also possible to start your own patch of catnip buy getting a division from an established bunching.  Caution: it IS a spreading/invasive perennial plant in the mint family - plan your planting accordingly.  Also remember that it is CATnip, your local cat population will definitely take any chance to visit your patch!

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  Can cause uterine contractions and encourage menstruation so should be avoided by pregnant women as well as those having disorders related to their menstrual cycles .   Do not use prior to surgery.  Discuss with your doctor if breastfeeding or if taking "sedative" type medications.  Avoid if you have PID.

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS: Vitamins: A, C, B1, B2, B3, B6 and B12 Minerals: Iron, magnesium, phosphorous, calcium, selenium, potassium;

NOTE:  Can be used as a rodent deterrent by scattering fresh leaves in areas you want the buggers to avoid. Also tends to repel cockroaches, mosquitos and termites.

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Cayenne (Capsicum annuum)

NOTE: You must use a 40,000 HU (heat unit) to receive any medicinal benefits.  Anything higher isn't "better" but if you want HOT go for it (but remember hotter may make it much less palatable to livestock). 

PROPERTIES: Anti-catarrhal, anti-emetic, anti-microbial, cardiac tonic, carminative, Diaphoretic, Febrifuge, Rubefacient, Sialagogue, stimulant, tonic

USES: energy boost, upset stomach, gas, cramps. poor circulation, excessive blood clotting, high cholesterol, preventing heart disease, toothache, seasickness, malaria, difficulty swallowing, fever, shingles, rheumatoid arthritis, nerve pain, muscle spasms, sore throat, sinus infections, migraines and cluster headaches.
 

AVAILABILITY:    You can grow your own peppers, however due to the specific need to have a certain minimum HU and the hassle of airborne particles when grinding the dried fruit I feel it is best to purchase a good organic powder.

PARTS USED: the fruit (pepper)

HOW TO PRESERVE: Drying and usually powdered

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: powder, salve, tincture, infusion, compress, infused oil

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  Can cause a mild to severe burning sensation when first applied. 

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS: Vitamins: A, B1, C:  Capsaicin,

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Chickweed (Stellaria media)

PROPERTIES: emollient, vulnerary,

USES: itching, eczema, detoxifier, blood purifier, tetanus, boils, herpes, inflamed breasts, swollen testicles,

AVAILABILITY:   I purchase this in bulk from our local health food store. 

PARTS USED: Entire plant

PARTS TO AVOID: None

WHEN TO HARVEST: Summer

HOW TO PRESERVE: drying

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: salve, poultice, tea, dried

HOW TO PROPAGATE: I have never grown chickweed, but from research done it seem pretty easy to grown just about anywhere.

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  Chickweed seems to be a pretty "safe" plant with no known precautions or issues.

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS: Vitamins: A, B, C;  Minerals: Magnesium, Cobalt,  Calcium, Iron; Mucilage, saponins

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Chicory (Cichorium intybus)

PROPERTIES: Hepatic, Diuretic,

USES: digestive issues, cleansing the liver, urinary tract issues, mild constipation,  topical swelling and inflammation, loss of appetite, cancer,

AVAILABILITY:  We purchase it in bulk at our health food store, but also have a small stand started in our yard.   

PARTS USED: Roots, leaves, flowers

PARTS TO AVOID: none known

WHEN TO HARVEST: roots: fall or spring

leaves: anytime

HOW TO PRESERVE: drying

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: infusion, dried, fresh (culinary), poultice,

HOW TO PROPAGATE: Sow by seed.  Fairly easy to grow but can easily take over a space.  Avoid wet soils.

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  Do not use while pregnant, may cause miscarriage.  Can cause an allergic reaction in some people (especially those who are allergic to ragweed, daisies, marigolds, or mums. Best to avoid if you have an issue with gallstones. 

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS: vitamins: minerals: potassium, phosphorous, Magnesium, Calcium; Inulin, lysine,

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Cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum)

PROPERTIES: Aromatic, Carminative, Stimulant, Antifungal (also a mold inhibitor), Antiviral, Emmenagogue, Antibacterial

USES: reduces menstral cramps, stimulates the digestive system, colic, pain reliever (including headaches), diarrhea, gas, nausea, vomiting, nose bleeds, excess perspiration,

AVAILABILITY:   Available at most local grocery stores

PARTS USED: Bark

HOW TO PRESERVE:   drying

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: Tincture, powder

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  May want to avoid during pregnancy in amounts other than for culinary use.  EO is especially dangerous during pregnancy.

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS: 

Volatile oil up to 4% (cinnamaldehyde 65 - 75%, eugenol 4 - 10%)

Tannins (condensed)

Coumarins

Mucilage

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Clove (Syzgium aromaticum)

PROPERTIES: Anti-emetic, Ant-microbial, Aromatic, Rubefacient, Antibacterial, Anti-viral,

USES: Toothache, nausea, scabies, athlete's foot, colic, bloating, acne, styes in the eyes, strep throat

AVAILABILITY:  Almost all local grocery stores.  However medicinal grade with better efficacy might be harder to find, but check your health food stores, and if not technically called medicinal grade - fresher is better.

PARTS USED: Flower Bud

HOW TO PRESERVE: dried

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: ground/powder

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS: 

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS:  volatile oil; eugenol (up to 85%), acetyl eugenol, methyl salicylate, pinene, vanillin. Gum and tannins

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Comfrey  (Symphytum officinale)

PROPERTIES:  Demulcent, Emollient, Expectorant, mucilage, Pectoral, Tonic, Vulnerary

USES: Bruises, sprains, wounds, broken bones, diarrhea, cough, sore throat, joint pain, arthritis, chest pain, inflammation, irritable bowel syndrome, bronchitis, pleurisy, acne

AVAILABILITY:  I haven't searched for availability of the plant in venues other than my own back yard.  I know there are many places to purchase root stock and plant starts to have your own backyard plant. 

PARTS USED: leaves, roots

PARTS TO AVOID: none

WHEN TO HARVEST: Leaves can be harvested continuously and a vigorous plant can be heavily harvested as many and three times per year.  Roots can be harvested anytime, but fall is best. 

HOW TO PRESERVE: leaves: drying  Roots: drying

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: tinctures, salves, oils, powders, poultices

HOW TO PROPAGATE:  VERY easy to propagate with even the smallest piece of root.  Be sure to plant where you want it to be permanently as once planted it will be hard to eradicate. 

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  Although comfrey has been used for many years internally as a tea, recent studies promote refraining from taking comfrey internally.  I personally have been using it to feed both our rabbits and pigs quite a bit and to a lesser degree our chickens and goats.  During butchering we have found no anomalies in the livers, all look very healthy. 

May interact very negatively on the liver if taken with drugs that can also negatively affect the liver such as acetaminophen and many others.

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS: NOTE: the heaviest concentrations are found in the root, except allantoin which is found in the most abundance in the leaves.  Vitamins: B1, B2, C,   Minerals: Calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium;   Allantoin, mucilage, protein, tannin

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Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale)

PROPERTIES: Antibilious, Cholagogue, diuretic, Hepatic, laxative, stimulant, tonic

USES: detoxification of the liver, skin problems such as acne, psoriasis and eczema, arthritis, gout, gallbladder, warts, skin toner, circulation

AVAILABILITY:  Available at local health food stores as well as in your own back yard. 

PARTS USED: Leaves, root and flower

PARTS TO AVOID: stems - not toxic but extremely bitter

WHEN TO HARVEST: leaves when young, roots in fall, flowers when in full bloom (after dew is off)

HOW TO PRESERVE: drying; jelly or wine can be made from the flowers

HOW TO PROPAGATE: seed is easier than transplanting as the taproot is quite long.

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  can interact with Lithium and certain antibiotics

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS: Vitamins: B2, C,  Minerals: Cobalt, Magnesium, Potassium, phosphorus, Copper, Zinc Calcium, Iron; Inulin, Mucilage,

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Eucalyptus  (Eucalyptus globulus)

PROPERTIES: Anti-microbial, antispasmodic, Febrifuge • Anti-Pyretic, stimulant

USES: to alleviate respiratory symptoms, rheumatic joints, muscle/joint stiffness, skin infections, skin parasites, sore throat

AVAILABILITY:  EO available at most healthfood stores and

PARTS USED:  leaves, oil

PARTS TO AVOID: NA

WHEN TO HARVEST: NA

HOW TO PRESERVE: Essential oils, tincture

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: (leaves) Herbal steam inhalation (EO) oral gargle, inhalation, massage oil, chest rub, compress

HOW TO PROPAGATE: NA in our area

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS: 

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS: The volatile oil contains about 70% eucalyptol (1, 8-cineole), as well as pinene, limonene, alpha-terpineol, and linalool.

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Echinacea (Echinacea angustifolia)

PROPERTIES: Alterative, Anti-catarrhal, anti-microbial, Tonic,

USES: common cold, flu, vaginal yeast infections, UTI, migraines, headaches, Chronic Fatigue syndrome, eczema, hayfever, allergies, bee stings, ADHD, general immune booster,

AVAILABILITY: Many Echinacea supplements can be found in local grocery store supplement aisles.  However it can also be grown in many gardens around the country. 

PARTS USED: Roots, Flowers

PARTS TO AVOID: none

WHEN TO HARVEST: Roots: fall (should be older plants - 4yr)  Flowers: during bloom

HOW TO PRESERVE: drying or tincturing of fresh parts

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: mixes (dried), tinctures, decoctions, gargle, capsules,

HOW TO PROPAGATE:  Seeds or sometimes root cuttings

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  Likely safe in most situations, however certain auto-immune diseases mixed with Echinacea may make these conditions worse. (RA, lupus, MS)

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS: Vitamins: Minerals: Calcium, Chromium,  Iron, Cobalt, Magnesium, Zinc; Ash, Inulin, Protein

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Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare)

PROPERTIES: Carminative, purgative, Anti-emetic, aromatic, Diaphoretic, Galactogogue, Hepatic

USES: bloat, poor appetite, stomach pain, kidney stones, colic, weightloss, relaxation, expectorant, sore throats, culinary

AVAILABILITY:  Can be found in most herb and culinary stores.  Can be grown in containers.

PARTS USED:  Seeds, root, essential oil

PARTS TO AVOID:

WHEN TO HARVEST:  Seeds: Fall when fully mature  Root: fall

HOW TO PRESERVE:  drying and EO

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: (seeds) Infusion, decoction, tincture, gargle,  (EO) chest rub (Root) Decoction

HOW TO PROPAGATE:

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  contact dermatitis has been noted from exposure to the EO; photo-dermatitis may occur after consumption of the plant parts; EO shouldn't be used in cooking or other food-type preparations as it can cause nausea, a sudden need to vomit, seizures, and even pulmonary edema.  High doses and/or heavy useage should be avoided during pregnancy.

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS: Volatile oils (inc. estragole, anethole),   Fatty acids, flavinoids (includig rutin) vitamins, Minerals: Calcium, copper, iron, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Potassium

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Garlic (Allium sativum)

PROPERTIES: Antibacterial and antiviral, alterative, Anthelmintic, Anti-Catarrhal, anti-microbial, Carminative, diaphoretic, Expectorant, pectoral, Rubefacient, stimulant, Tonic, Vulnerary,

USES: Colds, flu, earaches, infections, chest infections/issues, stroke(clot) prevention, strep throat, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, insect repellant

AVAILABILITY:  any grocery store, organic is best or grow your own!

PARTS USED: bulb

PARTS TO AVOID: none known

WHEN TO HARVEST:  Fall

HOW TO PRESERVE: dry;

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: powdered, tincture, fresh (best way)

HOW TO PROPAGATE: planting individual cloves in good soil should result in plenty of useful bulbs

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  Garlic has quite a few POSSIBLE drug interactions:  Blood thinners, birth control pills, certain HIV/AIDS medications, isoniazid, Saquinavir, Cyclosporine

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS: vitamins: Minerals: cobalt, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium; protein, flavonoids, inulin, Alliin

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German Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla)

PROPERTIES: Anti-inflammatory, Anti-spasmodic, aromatic, Bitter, Carminative, Diaphoretic, Emmenagogue, Nervine, Sedative, Tonic

USES: Gas, motion sickness, stuffy nose, hay fever, diarrhea, restlessness, sleeplessness, ADHD, fibromyagia, menstrual cramps, skin irritations, colic, hemorrhoids, radiation, oral sores, breast soreness, headache, earache, labor pains, vaginal infections, ringworm

AVAILABILITY:  Can be purchased at most health food stores

PARTS USED: Flowers

PARTS TO AVOID: none known although the flowers are the only parts of any use.

WHEN TO HARVEST: When flowers are fully open

HOW TO PRESERVE: drying, tinctures,

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: tinctures, infusions, vapor, ointment

HOW TO PROPAGATE: can be planted in most well cultivated gardens via seed

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  Possible issues if taken while experiencing hormone sensitive conditions (it can act like estrogen within the body)

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS: Vitamins: C   Minerals: Ash, Calcuim     Allicin, Alliin, Lysine, Phosphorus, Potassium

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Goldenseal  (Hydrastis Canadensis)

PROPERTIES: Antibiotic, anit-diarrheal, Alterative, Antibilious, Bitter, Cholagogue, Emmenagogue, Expectorant, Hepatic, Oxytocic, Pectoral, Tonic, Vulnerary

USES: eye infections, mouth sores, thrush, psorasis, yeast infections, vaginal/uterine hemorrhage, strep infections, sore throat, sinus infections, skin wounds, infection anywhere,

AVAILABILITY:   PURCHASE from a KNOWN source.  This is an herb often sold mixed with other plants or that actually IS another plant all together so make sure you are buying from a reputable source.   Goldenseal does grow wild in many areas but is considered a protected species in most of those areas due to over harvesting. 

PARTS USED: Root

PARTS TO AVOID:

WHEN TO HARVEST:

HOW TO PRESERVE: Drying

METHODS OF USE/DOSING:  Tinctures, powdered, infusion (teas for eyes or mouth rinses)

HOW TO PROPAGATE:

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  Do not use internal remedies for extended periods of time as it can cause problems with nutrient absorption (particularly B vitamins); High doses should be avoided due to gastrointestinal upset and possible nervous system issues.

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS: Vitamins: C, B1,  minerals: Calcium, Iron, magnesium, Ash, cobalt, zinc, phosporus  Other: berberine

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Honey

This should be RAW honey.    

PROPERTIES:  Anti-viral and anti-bacterial.  It also has the added benefit of making some remedies more palatable. 

USES: Wounds, burns, energy booster, antioxidants, morning sickness, infertility (both male and female), acne, sedative, canker sores, eczema, Calcium absorption and hemoglobin count can be increased by raw honey to prevent anemia. 

AVAILABILITY:  Can be grown at home, but for most it is easier to purchase at the store. 

PARTS TO AVOID: The bees back ends

WHEN TO HARVEST: Fall

HOW TO PRESERVE: In a jar.

HOW TO PROPAGATE: Get bees!!

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  Not for use in human children under one year of age.

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS:  Vitamins: B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, C; minerals Magnesium, potassium, calcium, sodium chlorine, calcium, copper, iron, manganese, sulphur, zinc and phosphate

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Hops (Humulus lupulus)

PROPERTIES: Analgesic, Anodyne, Bitter, Hypnotic, Nervine, sedative,

USES: Anxiety, insomnia, tenseness, ADHD, improving appetite, indigestion, TB, cramps, cancers(prostate, breast, ovarian), reducing cholesterol, nerve pain, start the flow of breast milk, irritability

AVAILABILITY:   You can purchase these , however we grow our own.  If you can find a source of rootstock I suggest getting some.  These are vigorous perennials which can be used for a privacy fence during the growing months.   

PARTS USED: Strobiles (flower);  New fast growing shoots are also edible similar to asparagus.

PARTS TO AVOID: None are known to be generally dangerous, but there seems to be not much use for the leaves unless using as a livestock fodder.

WHEN TO HARVEST: When strobiles are dry on the vine and "rustle" or feel like paper.  They should still be greenish in color. 

HOW TO PRESERVE: drying,

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: tinctures, infusions, capsules, compresses

HOW TO PROPAGATE: Easily propagated using root cuttings/divisions.  A good humus and compost rich soil is a must for these quick growing plants.  They can grow as much as a foot per DAY.  A strong trellis is necessary to allow for good strong growth and ease of harvesting.  However a series of tall vertical wires will also work well.

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  Do not use with certain anti-depressants or sedative medications. If depression is a possible diagnosis in a patient avoid use of hops.  Use caution if using during pregnancy.  Do not use before surgery.

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS:  vitamins: B6, B1, B2, B3 and B12, A, C; ash, calcium, phosphorus, potassium, protein, tannins (and pectin); VO, vlerianic acid, tannins, flavonoids

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Juniper (Juniperus communis)

PROPERTIES: Anti-microbial, Carminative, Diuretic, Emmenagogue, Stimulant

USES: Kidney ailments, reducing blood sugar, arthritis, Urinary tract Infections, gout,

AVAILABILITY:  Can be grown easily in our area, but I prefer to just purchase the berries from our local healthfood store who has them in bulk. 

PARTS USED: Fruitt, EO

PARTS TO AVOID:

WHEN TO HARVEST:

HOW TO PRESERVE:  Drying

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: Infusions, powdered, tincture

HOW TO PROPAGATE: Can be grown from seed or even propagated by layering branches from an existing plant.  Requires little in the way of soil amendments and can even be found growing in very rocky soils.

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  Do not use while pregnant, overuse or overdosing can overstimulate the kidneys and cause irritation.  This plant is NOT to be confused with the VERY TOXIC Yew (which can be fatal if ingested).  Do not use if you have diabetes as it can cause unsafe sugar levels.  Juniper is not a "beginner safe" herb.

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS:  Calcium, Protein  "Chemical analysis of juniper berries have validated that they enclose one per cent to two percent of a volatile oil that comprises over 60 compounds, such as sabinene, myrcene, cineole, alpha-pinene and beta-pinene. In addition, juniper berries also include tannis, resin, sugar, diterpenes and Vitamin C. The juniper berries also enclose invert sugar to the extent of around 30 per cent and little quantities of flavoniods, catechins as well as leucoanthocyanidins:  (herbs2000)

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Lavender (Lavandula officinalis syn. L. angustifolia)

PROPERTIES: Anti-emetic, Nervine

USES: culinary, crafts, beauty products, muscle pain, tension headaches, lice, bronchial spasms, colic, indigestion, nervous exhaustion, migraines, eczema, bug bites/stings, herpes, wrinkles

AVAILABILITY: Can be purchased through MANY avenues or be grown in most areas (perennial)

PARTS USED: leaves, flowers, EO

PARTS TO AVOID:

WHEN TO HARVEST: (flowers) when last flower on stalk blooms; (leaves and flowers) early morning before sun is fully upon them.

HOW TO PRESERVE: drying, EO

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: (flowers) infusion, tincture, mouthwash (EO) creams, lotions, chest rub, hair rinse, massage oil

HOW TO PROPAGATE: Seeds or cuttings. Grows best with good sunlight exposure in drier sandy alkaline soils, but is tolerant of many areas.

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  contact dermatitis is possible;  LOW doses are a must as it can cause muscular convulsions and death in HIGH doses.

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS:  Volatile oils: (up to 3%) containing over 40 constituents, including linalyl acetate (30-60%), cineole (10%), linalool, nerol, borneol, flavonoids, tannins, courmarins

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Lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus)

PROPERTIES: Culinary; carminative, digestive tonic, a febrifuge or analgesic, antifungal, diuretic, sedative

USES: Lemongrass is used for treating digestive tract spasms, stomachache, high blood pressure, convulsions, pain, vomiting, cough, achy joints (rheumatism), fever, the common cold, and exhaustion. It is also used to kill germs and as a mild astringent. Sprains

 NOTE: Lemongrass EO works wonders to lure a feral bee swarm into your empty bee hive.  Just put a few drops on a cotton ball and drop into the back of the empty hive.

AVAILABILITY:   

PARTS USED: Dried above ground parts; EO

PARTS TO AVOID:

WHEN TO HARVEST:

HOW TO PRESERVE:

METHODS OF USE/DOSING:

HOW TO PROPAGATE:  Can be container grown.

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  Most commonly used as an EO...caution should be observed especially when pregnant or nursing. 

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS:

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Lemon Balm  (Melissa officinalis)

PROPERTIES: Nervine,

USES: Alzheimers, cold sores, colic, digestive issues, anxiety, spasms, sleeping disorders, headaches, toothaches, cramps, ADHD, insect bites, tumors, promoting menstrual flow, nausea, vomiting, fevers, culinary

AVAILABILITY:  Can be easily grown in most climates - spreads heartily.  We also find the cut herb at the local healthfood store in bulk.

PARTS USED: Aerial parts,

PARTS TO AVOID: None known

WHEN TO HARVEST: any time

HOW TO PRESERVE: drying

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: decoctions, infusions

HOW TO PROPAGATE: Can be planted by seed or root divisions.  Rich fertile moist soils are best.  Mulch heavily during the winter months in harsh climates to help protect the roots from freezing. 

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  According to WebMD usage of lemon balm should be halted about 2 weeks prior to surgery that will require anesthesia.  No other side effects or cautions have been located.

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS:   Tannins, bitter principle, flavonoids, rosmarinic acid, volatile oils (cintronella), polyphenols

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Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra)

PROPERTIES: Emollient, Demulcent, Expectorant, Pectoral, Tonic

USES: muscle cramps, heartburn, nausea, cramping, hepatitis, stomach ulcers, weightloss, CFS, cough, infections, arthritis,  addictions, canker sores, viral infections

AVAILABILITY:     We purchase in bulk from a local healthfood store.

PARTS USED: Root

PARTS TO AVOID: none known

WHEN TO HARVEST: Fall

HOW TO PRESERVE: Drying

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: tinctures, decoctions

HOW TO PROPAGATE:

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  It has been found that over use of licorice can cause water retention, low potassium levels, weakness, absence of a menstrual period, headache, decreased sexual interest and function.  Over use can also be found in those who chew tobacco flavored with licorice.  Do NOT take while pregnant.  May act like estrogen in the body and could worsen conditions such as breast/uterine/ovarian cancers, endometriosis or uterine fibroids.

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS: Vitamins: C, Minerals: Ash, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Potassium, Protein; saponins, glycosides, volatile oil, coumarins, flavonoids, sterols, choline, asparagine

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Lobelia (Lobelia Inflata)

PROPERTIES: Emetic, Expectorant, Febrifuge • Anti-Pyretic, Nervine, Sedative, Anti-spasmodic

USES: smoking cessation, chest and sinus issues, blood cleanser, asthma, bronchitis, earaches, fevers (Lobelia is ofte used as a carrier herb and tends to be used most often mixed  with other herbs)

AVAILABILITY:    Easily purchased at local healthfood stores.  Grows readily in most areas of the United States.

PARTS USED: Flower, seed, root

PARTS TO AVOID:

WHEN TO HARVEST:

HOW TO PRESERVE: drying

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: dried herb, decoction, tincture(made of 50/50 ACV and alcohol),  infusion

HOW TO PROPAGATE: Can be started by seed.  Prefers fallow land in clearings or poor pasture lands. 

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  can irritate the GI tract, use caution during pregnancy or nursing, overdose: fast heartbeat, sweatig, convulsions, low blood pressure, collapse, coma or death

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS:  Vitamin: C, B1, A Minerals: Cobalt, Calcium, Iron, Potassium, Protein, Manganese

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Male Fern (Dryopteris filix-mas)

PROPERTIES: Anthelmentic

USES: nosebleeds, heavy menstrual bleeding, wounds, tumors, dewormer (typically tapeworms)

AVAILABILITY:  We purchase on-line 

PARTS USED: Root and fronds

PARTS TO AVOID:

WHEN TO HARVEST: fall

HOW TO PRESERVE: Dried

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: dried herbs, infused oils

HOW TO PROPAGATE:

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  Male fern is said to be highly toxic.  We have only used it as an ingredient in our livestock wormer.  Best not used during pregnancy.

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS: Tannins

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Mallow (malva parviflora)

NOTE: There are many varieties of Mallow.  In our case we use the above mallow, also known as cheeseweed.   

PROPERTIES: Anti-catarrhal, Demulcent, Emollient, Expectorant, Mucilage, Pectoral, Vulnerary

USES: Sores, skin inflammation, burns, wounds, insect bites, chapped skin, diarrhea, constipation, stomach ulcer, throat irritations, cough 

AVAILABILITY:  Mallow root can be purchased at our local healthfood store,but we wildcraft ours 

PARTS USED: root; leaves, flowers

PARTS TO AVOID:

WHEN TO HARVEST: Anytime

HOW TO PRESERVE: Drying

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: tinctures, teas, poultices

HOW TO PROPAGATE: Grows well from seed.

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS: 

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS:  vitamins: C, Minerals: Ash,  potassium; mucilage and tannins. The purplish-pink colored flowers of the herb also enclose an anthocyanin (which is a pigment that produces blue, violet, and red colors in plants) known as malvin.

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Molasses

It MUST be blackstrap molasses....check your iron content on the label.

PROPERTIES:

USES: energy boost and a good source of iron

AVAILABILITY:  Purchase at my local grocery store.

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: Good additve to many mixes as a binder and boost.

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS: 

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS: Iron

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Mullein  (Verbascum Thapsus)

PROPERTIES: astringent, demulcent, pectoral, anti-catarrhal, emollient, expectorant, vulnerary, sedative, narcotic

USES: lungs (respiratory issues), ear aches, skin disorders, sun burn, hemorrhoids, tonsillitis, chicken pox, measles, mumps, TB, asthma, bruises, frost bite, migraines,

AVAILABILITY:  Available just about everywhere around here.  Really like open fields with low soil quality or the edges of treated fields (USE CAUTION when harvesting in the wild.)

PARTS USED: Leaves, flowers, roots

PARTS TO AVOID:  none known

WHEN TO HARVEST: Summer

HOW TO PRESERVE: drying

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: tinctures, syrups, infusions, infused oils

HOW TO PROPAGATE: can be transplanted from wild stands of the plant or seeds can be concocted from the growing plants.  Mullein is a biennial plant.

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  None known

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS: Vitamins: C,  Minerals:  Calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, protein(seeds) mucilage, flavonoids, saponins, VO, tannis

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Myrrh (Commiphora molmol syn. C. myrrha)

PROPERTIES: Tonic, Vulnerary, anthelmentic, Anti-microbial, astringent, antiseptic,

USES: Canker sores, gingivitis, bad breath, loose teeth, mouth infections, liver flukes, thrush, vaginal yeast infections, hemorrhoids, bedsores, asthma, cough, congestion,

AVAILABILITY:   Purchased at our local health food store in capsule form

PARTS USED: Gum/resin

PARTS TO AVOID: N/A

WHEN TO HARVEST: N/A

HOW TO PRESERVE:  drying

METHODS OF USE/DOSING:  Tincture, powder (Myrrh is not water soluble and also not well absorbed in the intestines.  Most often used as a rinse or gargle.)

HOW TO PROPAGATE: Not able to grow in our area (grows in Africa)

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:   DO NOT USE WHILE PREGNANT May affect blood sugar levels and can possible worsen a fever.

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS: volatile oils, resins

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Olive Leaf (Olea europaea)

PROPERTIES: Anti-microbial,

USES: mild diuretic, reduce blood pressure, cystitis, inflammation of the bladder, lower blood sugar, constipation

AVAILABILITY:  We purchase at our local health food store 

PARTS USED: leaves and oil from fruits

PARTS TO AVOID:

WHEN TO HARVEST: leaves anytime, fruits in fall.

HOW TO PRESERVE: Drying

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: herb, tincture, oil

HOW TO PROPAGATE: Grows as a tree in milder climates

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS: 

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS:  Calcium, Protein

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Pau d'Arco (Tabebuia heptaphylla )

PROPERTIES: anthelmintic, anti-bacterial, anti-viral,

USES:  intestinal worms, cold, yeast infections, flu, bladder infections, diabetes, ulcers, asthma, arthritis-like pain, gonorrhea, syphilis, boils, bronchitis, ringworm

AVAILABILITY:    Purchased locally from our healthfood store (caution there are faux herbs out there of this particular herb.)

PARTS USED: Inner Bark

PARTS TO AVOID:

WHEN TO HARVEST:

HOW TO PRESERVE:  drying

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: herb

HOW TO PROPAGATE:

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  may slow blood clotting 

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS: Calcium, cobalt, protein, zinc

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Peppermint (Mentha piperita)

PROPERTIES: anti-catarrhal, anti-microbial, diaphoretic, carminative, emmenagogue, nervine, febrifuge, stimulant

USES: Indigestion, flatulence, colic, menstrual cramps, headaches(migraines), sore muscles, sinus congestion, Culinary

AVAILABILITY: Easy to purchase dried at our local healthfood store as well as very easy to propagate in the backyard garden.

PARTS USED: aerial parts (all above ground parts)

PARTS TO AVOID:

WHEN TO HARVEST: anytime plant is mature (best to pick off buds before they bloom)

HOW TO PRESERVE: dried, essential oils, freezing

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: teas, salve, ointments, oils

HOW TO PROPAGATE: Grow well from cuttings.  Well drained soil.  Often recommended to plant within borders as it an spread out of control. 

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS: 

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS:  Flavinoids, vitamins:  Minerals: Calcium

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Plantain (plantago major)

PROPERTIES: anti-microbial, Emollient, Vulnerary, Febrifuge • Anti-Pyretic, anti-inflammitory,

USES: Bee (or other insect) stings/bites, wounds, vomiting, diarrhea, tuberculosis, asthma, colic, stomach ache, colds, hayfever, sore throats, ear infections, bruises, broken bones, hemorrhoids, IBS, bladder infections,

AVAILABILITY:  located all over the United States in yards and vacant lots.  Can easily be propagated from seeds collected.  Can also be found in many healthfood stores in a dried form.

PARTS USED: leaves, roots

PARTS TO AVOID: none

WHEN TO HARVEST: spring through summer

HOW TO PRESERVE: drying; tincturing fresh leaves is also a good method; best used when fresh

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: tinctures, powdered, Juice, fresh crushed leaves, ointments, infusions(seeds),

HOW TO PROPAGATE: Plant in practically any soil either by seed or transplanting.

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  High in Vitamin K it can interfere with anti-clotting drugs.

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS:  Vitamins: K MineralsOther: iridoids, flavinoids, tannins, mucilage 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is the long leaf variety, often also called "ribwort".

 

 

 

 

 

 

 This is the more common variety that most people associate with Plantain.

 

 

 

 

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Purslane (Portulaca oleracea)

PROPERTIES:

USES: Culinary, parasite removal, dysentry, infection

AVAILABILITY:  grows abundantly in the wild in our area - especially in disturbed areas (like our garden)

PARTS USED: leaves, stems, buds

PARTS TO AVOID:

WHEN TO HARVEST: Early morning.

HOW TO PRESERVE: pickled

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: Great in soups.

HOW TO PROPAGATE: by seed in nitrogen rich soils

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  May contain higher levels of oxalate (similar to spinach) which could contribute to kidney stone formation.

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS: Omega  3 fatty acids, antioxidants Vitamins: A, C   Minerals: Calcium, Magnesium, Potassium

 

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Queen Anne's Lace (Wild Carrot)

PROPERTIES:

USES:

AVAILABILITY:   

PARTS USED:

PARTS TO AVOID:

WHEN TO HARVEST:

HOW TO PRESERVE:

METHODS OF USE/DOSING:

HOW TO PROPAGATE:

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS: 

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS:

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Red Clover

PROPERTIES: Nervine, Sedative, Alterative, Tonic

USES:

AVAILABILITY:   

PARTS USED:

PARTS TO AVOID:

WHEN TO HARVEST:

HOW TO PRESERVE:

METHODS OF USE/DOSING:

HOW TO PROPAGATE:

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS: 

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS:

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Shepherd's Purse

PROPERTIES: 

USES:

AVAILABILITY:   

PARTS USED:

PARTS TO AVOID:

WHEN TO HARVEST:

HOW TO PRESERVE:

METHODS OF USE/DOSING:

HOW TO PROPAGATE:

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS: 

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS: vitamins:   Minerals:

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Red Raspberry (Rubus idaeus)

PROPERTIES: Astringent, Emmenagogue, Febrifuge, Galactogogue

USES: strengthen uterus, encourage lactation,

AVAILABILITY:   Can be found wild in our area.  We have also grown it easily on our property.  Can be found in health food stores as a supplement also.

PARTS USED: leaves

PARTS TO AVOID: None known

WHEN TO HARVEST: leaves: anytime

fruit: when ripe (early summer)

HOW TO PRESERVE: drying

METHODS OF USE/DOSING: Tea, fresh,

HOW TO PROPAGATE:  Plant roots.  Your berry patch can be increased by layering canes.

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS:  Use caution during pregnancy.

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS: Vitamins:  C, B1  Minerals: Ash, Calcium, Phosphorus, potassium, Cobalt, Iron; Dextrose, protein, Tannin

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Spirulina

PROPERTIES: 

USES:

AVAILABILITY:   

PARTS USED:

PARTS TO AVOID:

WHEN TO HARVEST:

HOW TO PRESERVE:

METHODS OF USE/DOSING:

HOW TO PROPAGATE:

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS: 

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS: vitamins:   Minerals:

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Slippery Elm

PROPERTIES: Astringent, Demulcent, Emollient, Mucilage, Vulnerary

USES:

AVAILABILITY:   

PARTS USED: Bark

PARTS TO AVOID:

WHEN TO HARVEST:

HOW TO PRESERVE:

METHODS OF USE/DOSING:

HOW TO PROPAGATE:

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS: 

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS:

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Stinging Nettle

PROPERTIES:  Alterative, Rubefacient, Tonic

USES:

AVAILABILITY:   

PARTS USED:

PARTS TO AVOID:

WHEN TO HARVEST:

HOW TO PRESERVE:

METHODS OF USE/DOSING:

HOW TO PROPAGATE:

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS: 

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS: vitamins: B1, B2, B3 and B5. C, A, D, E and K

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Tea Tree

PROPERTIES:

USES:

AVAILABILITY:   

PARTS USED:

PARTS TO AVOID:

WHEN TO HARVEST:

HOW TO PRESERVE:

METHODS OF USE/DOSING:

HOW TO PROPAGATE:

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS: 

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS:

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St. John's Wort

PROPERTIES:  Analgesic, Anodyne, anti-inflammatory, Emmenagogue, sedative, Vulnerary

USES:

AVAILABILITY:   

PARTS USED:

PARTS TO AVOID:

WHEN TO HARVEST:

HOW TO PRESERVE:

METHODS OF USE/DOSING:

HOW TO PROPAGATE:

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS: 

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS:

 

 

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Thyme

PROPERTIES:  Anti-catarrhal, anti-microbial, Anti-spasmodic, Carminative, Diaphoretic, Emmenagogue, Expectorant, Febrifuge • Anti-Pyretic, nervine, Tonic, Vulnerary

USES:

AVAILABILITY:   

PARTS USED:

PARTS TO AVOID:

WHEN TO HARVEST:

HOW TO PRESERVE:

METHODS OF USE/DOSING:

HOW TO PROPAGATE:

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS: 

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS:

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Wild Yam

PROPERTIES: Antibilious, Antispasmodic, Cholagogue, Hepatic, Sedative, Stimulant, Tonic,

USES:

AVAILABILITY:   

PARTS USED:

PARTS TO AVOID:

WHEN TO HARVEST:

HOW TO PRESERVE:

METHODS OF USE/DOSING:

HOW TO PROPAGATE:

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS: 

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS: Vitamins: C, B1,  minerals:

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Wormwood

PROPERTIES:  Anthelmintic, Antibilious, anti-microbial, Bitter, Emmenagogue, hepatic, Nervine, Stimulant, Tonic

USES:

AVAILABILITY:   

PARTS USED:

PARTS TO AVOID:

WHEN TO HARVEST:

HOW TO PRESERVE:

METHODS OF USE/DOSING:

HOW TO PROPAGATE:

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS: 

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS:

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Yarrow

PROPERTIES:  Anti-catarrhal, astringent, Diaphoretic, Diuretic, Emmenagogue, Hepatic, Stimulant, tonic, Vulnerary

USES:

AVAILABILITY:   

PARTS USED:

PARTS TO AVOID:

WHEN TO HARVEST:

HOW TO PRESERVE:

METHODS OF USE/DOSING:

HOW TO PROPAGATE:

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS: 

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Yellow Dock

PROPERTIES:  Alterative, Hepatic, Laxative, Tonic,

USES: anemia,

AVAILABILITY:   

PARTS USED:

PARTS TO AVOID:

WHEN TO HARVEST:

HOW TO PRESERVE:

METHODS OF USE/DOSING:

HOW TO PROPAGATE:

PRECAUTIONS AND SIDE EFFECTS: 

CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS:  vitaminsB1, B2, B3 and B5 A and C minerals: Iron

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GLOSSARY

Aerial Parts - parts of the plant that grow above ground. (leaves, stems, flowers) 

Antiviral - An Agent that kills a virus or that suppresses its ability to replicate and therefore inhibits its capability to multiply and reproduce.

 Antibacterial - An agent that inhibits bacterial growth or kills bacteria.

Analgesic, Anodyne - Analgesic herbs are those which help in alleviating pain and are applied topically on the affected part of the body or taken internally, subject to the condition that is being treated.

Anthelmintic -  Herbs that are known as anthelmintics work to eliminate or force out worms from our digestive system.

Antibilious -  Herbs that are antibilious assist the body in getting rid of surplus bile and, thereby, they can be of help in treating conditions like jaundice and those related to the bile.

Anti-catarrhal  -  Herbs possessing anti-catarrhal properties aid the body in getting rid of excessive accumulation of catarrhal build-up (mucus membrane inflammation occurring together with extreme secretions), irrespective of whether it occurs in the sinus region or any other part of the body.

Anti-emetic -  The anti-emetic herbs possess the aptitude to lessen the nauseated feeling and, at the same time, aid in providing relief from vomiting or putting off vomiting.

Anti-inflammatory -  Aid the body in fighting inflammations. All other herbs that are listed in the demulcent, emollient and vulnerary categories also act in this way quite frequently, particularly when they are applied topically on the affected body part.

Anti-lithic - Work to put off the development of gravel or stones in the urinary system and may also aid the body in getting rid of them.

Anti-microbial -  Are able to assist the body in destroying disease-bearing microorganisms or protecting the body from their invasion.

Anti-spasmodic - Have the aptitude to put off or alleviate cramps or spasms in the body.

Aperient  - Work as extremely mild purgatives.

Aromatic - All herbs that are aromatic possess a potent and mostly pleasing smell, having the ability to invigorate the digestive system. Aromatic herbs are used to append the perfume as well as flavor of other medications.

Astringent - Astringent herbs work to tighten the tissues by means of triggering proteins and, hence, they are able to lessen the secretions as well as discharges. Astringent herbs enclose tannins.

 Bitter - Have a bitter flavor and work in the form of invigorating tonics for our digestive system by means of a reflex through the taste buds.

Cardiac Tonic  - Herbs that act as cardiac tonics have an effect on the heart. These herbs have a specific functioning and it ought to be searched in the herbal division.

Carminative – These usually contain high amounts of unstable oils and their actions stimulate the peristalsis of our digestive system and, at the same time, help the stomach to loosen up. In this way, carminative herbs encourage the digestive process and aid in removing the gas formed in the digestive tract.

Cholagogue  - These work to promote the secretion and release of bile from the gall-bladder, which may result in a notable benefit in case of problems related to the gall-bladder. These herbs also possess purgative properties and have an effect on the digestive system, as the volume of bile present in the duodenum enhances when an individual takes these herbs. It may be noted here that bile is produced by the body and is a natural purgative.

Decoction - an extracting process: the extraction of an essence or active ingredient from a substance by boiling

Demulcent -  Have high mucilage content and have the aptitude to calm as well as shield the aggravated or inflamed tissues inside the body.

Diaphoretic - Diaphoretic herbs can help the skin to get rid of toxic substances and, at the same time, induce sweating.

Diuretic  - Work to increase the production as well as elimination of urine.

Emetic – To induce vomiting. Most of the herbs listed under this category result in vomiting only when they are used in high dose.

Emmenagogue -  Encourage as well as regularize the menstrual flow. In fact, the term emmenagogue is frequently used in the perspective of medications that work in the form of tonics for the reproductive system in females.

Emollient - Emollient herbs are applied topically to the skin with a view to make it softer, calm it or defend it from any harm. These herbs work in the same way as the demulcents work inside the body.

Expectorant -  Herbs possessing expectorant properties help the body in getting rid of surplus mucus from the respiratory system.

Febrifuge or Anti-Pyretic – Assist the body in lowering fevers

Galactogogue - Have the aptitude to assist mothers who are breast-feeding to enhance the flow of their milk.

Hepatic - Helps the liver. Using hepatic herbs regularizes as well as fortifies the liver. At the same time, these herbs help to augment the release of bile from the liver.

Hypnotic - Hypnotic herbs facilitate bringing on sleep.

Laxative -  Herbs possessing laxative or purgative properties work to stimulate the emptying of the bowels.

Mucilage - Enclose gelatinous elements and they frequently work like emollients and demulcents.

Nervine -  Herbs called nervines have a positive action on the nervous system and they help to harmonize as well as fortify it. A number of nervine herbs also work in the form of stimulants, while some others act as relaxants.

Oxytocic -  Oxytocic herbs work to encourage the uterus to contract and they may, therefore, be useful during childbirth.

Pectoral -  Have a common curative as well as strengthening outcome on our respiratory system.

Probiotic - A substance containing beneficial microorganisms: a substance containing live microorganisms that claims to be beneficial to humans and animals, e.g. by restoring the balance of microflora in the digestive tract.

Rubefacient - Applied topically to the skin and their application generally results in a mild irritation, while stimulating the widening of the capillaries just beneath the skin. This action of these herbs helps to improve the skin’s blood circulation. When these herbs are applied to the skin, it helps to pull blood from more profound areas of the body to the skin. This, in turn, frequently helps to alleviate internal pains.

Sedative - Herbs having sedative or tranquilizing properties work to soothe the nervous system as well as lessen the strain and anxiety all over the body. Therefore, these herbs may possibly have an influence on the body tissues that have been aggravated due to problems related to the nervous system.

Sialagogue - Herbs that are called sialagogues are those that promote the saliva secretion from the salivary glands.

Soporific -  Like hypnotics, soporific herbs help to bring on or promote sleep.

Stimulant -  Herbs having stimulant properties hasten as well as enliven the body’s physiological functioning.

Styptic - All herbs categorized as styptics lessen or put an end to external hemorrhage owing to their astringent properties.

 Tonic - As the name indicates, tonic herbs work to fortify as well as make particular organs more vigorous. In addition, they also have a positive (similar) action on the entire body.

Vulnerary - Herbs that are classified as vulneraries are applied topically to help the body to cure cuts as well as wounds.

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Disclaimers and Credits

I am not a doctor or veterinarian.  Nor have I been formally trained in either botany of any sort or herbalism/herbal nutrition.  I am sharing things we have used and/or collected in our area.  Information on herbs has been collected from MANY sites on the web, books and personal conversations with others following the same path.  I will cite a few of the major contributors here :

http://www.herbs2000.com/

http://www.motherherbs.com/

http://www.herballagacy.org/

http://www.ars-grin.gov/duke/plants.html   THIS site is great.  You can type in the plant and find all the constiuents located within that plant including specifics to the part(s) of plant having the highest concentrations.  You can also then click on the each heavily occuring chemical and see what the properites of that chemical are. 

The Accessible Pet, Equine and Livestock Herbal  (choosing abundant wellness for your creatures) by Katherine A. Drovdahl   (http://firmeadowllc.com/)

Backyard Medicine: Harvest and make your own herbal remedies by May 1, 2009  by Julie Bruton-Seal (Author), Matthew Seal (Author)  (http://www.amazon.com/Backyard-Medicine-Harvest-Herbal-Remedies/dp/1602397015)

 

This list will occasionally be edited to add new links or delete broken links.

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Farm Production Totals

Wow...I'm WAY behind in posting totals.  I guess 2017 will be a better year.  ;)

2017

(last update 6/22/17)

Meat: 0

Vegetables/fruits: 48#

Eggs (chicken only):  1038

Honey: 0

Maple Syrup: 0 (this year is a bust)

Fiber: 2.94 oz

Babies born/hatched: 97

Jars into the pantry (dehydrated and canned): 16

Milk: 20+ gallons (I haven't been keeping track very well!)

New Additions:  12


2015

 

(last update 10/31/15)

 

Meat: 362#

Vegetables/Fruit: 551.88#

Eggs: 1918

Honey: 28#

Maple Syrup:  2 gallons

Angora Fiber:

Babies Born/hatched:  157

Jars into the pantry: 113

Milk: 16 gallons

New additons:  60 (plus a nuc of bees)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014

Meat: 240#

Vegetables/Fruit: Didn't keep track

Eggs: 3348

Honey: 1 pint

Maple Syrup: None

Angora Fiber: 5 oz

Babies Born/hatched: 168

Jars into the pantry: 150

Milk: 5 gallons